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The water of the Mediterranean Sea used to flood the whole area in certain seasons of the jn. However, due to its magnificent geographical location, the location was suitable to be the entrance to the Escotrs Canal, so De Lesseps braved the harsh conditions. He brought the fresh water needed for the workers who dig the Suez Canal from pkrt cities like Damietta. Afterward, after the szid of Abbassa conduit that connected Port Said to the water of the River Nile, finding fresh water was never a problem again in Port Said. Port Said at the time was isolated from other cities around Egypt and there were no paved roads to connect it to the other regions in the country or any other means of transportation inside or around the city.

This was why during the digging of the Suez Canal a road that ran along the Canal was paved. View Larger Map In the beginning, the engineers and laborers who worked in the digging of the Suez Canal used to live in tents, but De Lesseps got rid of the tents and had wooden huts built, and then stone houses started spreading all over the city step by step.

With the construction of new houses, some neighborhoods started to appear. There were two sections of the city of in the early stages of its construction; one for the foreigners and the other for the Egyptians. Afterward, the city was officially divided into these two sections in with the Mohamed Ali Street situated between them. After the opening of the Suez Canal on November 17,more inhabitants started to settle in the city of Port Said and the European engineers and Egyptian laborers who worked in the construction of the canal brought their families and they formed a new, distinctive community.

The Old Community of Port Said People from different backgrounds, several races, and multiple nationalities were living peacefully side by side in different neighborhoods of Port Said. Overnight we found the two worst problems about French trains, the underfloor heating with the hot air coming up through metal grills on the floor making our feet very hot, and their toilets, how can one hold on and aim through a hole in the floor between two footholds worse for women I would imagine! After seven uneventful days at sea during which time we never saw land presumably we must have passed Malta during the night and through rough seas when we frequently could not see our escort.

Port Said We arrived at Port Said where we saw a not to be forgotton sight - natives coaling a ship by hand. Two lines, one carrying baskets of Coal on their backs up a gangway, the other line coming down a different gangway carrying the empty baskets. Another memorable sight was the loading of sides of Beef where two men would load a side of beef onto another waiting man, who would then stagger away with it. We entrained at Port Said for Cairo and saw on the journey just how primitive life in Egypt really was. The Valentias were so old and ungainly that often when flying up the Nile Valley against a headwind, the true ground speed was only 30 mph!. At Heliopolis we were accomodated in what can only be described as modern, light and airy barracks with verandahs, showers and toilets.

In summer we worked for an hour and a half before breakfast, sustained only by a mug of tea. After breakfast, we went off to work again until about noon after which we were off duty resting on our beds sleeping or relaxing. As I mentioned before, we all had had no square bashing, due to the icy parade ground at Padgate, this had to be organised before we did our first Guard Duty. After just enough training to know which end of the rifle was which we did our first duty. Nobody was impailed on bayonets and we had no ammo for the rifles so nothing untoward happened!.

A number of us had a night flight over Cairo in one of the Bombays flown by the CO, you could see the Nile as a dark ribbon surrounded by the lights of Cairo. If we weren't sleeping in the afternoon, we could go from Heliopolis to Cairo by metro tram and in due course we went to Giza and saw the pyramids and the Sphinx. During an eerie tour around a Pyramid, the guide lit a piece of Magnesium tape, so that we could see the walls of the chamber.

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We could also go swimming at the local pool, although we had to be careful not to get sunburned. In the evening, being sub tropical it was dark by 8 pm, we had the open air cinema in Heliopolis. We became friendly with a civilian family and used to visit them in their home. We were very wicked and used to heat up Piastre pieces and then throw them to the natives whose antics had to be seen to be believed. However all good things come to an end and I was posted to Army Co-operation Squadron flying Lysanders at Qasaba near Mersah Matruh, being transported there by one of the squadron Valentias.

It should be mentioned at this point that after the fall of France, the Italians came into the war with the Germans and the unmistakable sound of their S. During this period squadron spotted for the artillery over Bardia. Eventually the Italians were forced into retreat and we were moved up to into Libya where we saw long lines of Italian POWs being herded into captivity and enjoying it!. We got as far as Barce, where we acquired an abandoned Fiatcomplete with fuel for it, in which we ran around the airfield. We had hopes of driving it back to Cairo, but this plan had to be abandoned when rain waterlogged the airfield.

We were recalled to Cairo to go over to Greece and we were once again parked in the North camp at Heliopolis. We embarked at Alexandria just after the battle of Cape Matapan and we were not very amused when we heard the sound of depth charges exploding. After an otherwise uneventful trip we arrived in Piraeus and we were taken to Daphne a few miles away. Here we sampled the local Retzina, a pine resin flavoured white wine and Mavrodaphne a sweetish red wine, neither of which we paid for - it was not on the house however, one of our fellow drinkers had paid!. While there, the Clan Fraser was bombed in Piraeus harbour which blew up scattering pieces of steel plating and also unissued Greek Bank notes of various denominations far and wide.

Eventually we got a movement order to move north to the airfield at Larissa in Thessaly and we could clearly see Mount Olympus. We entrained in Athens in railway trucks clearly marked 40 men or 8 horses, we had our own kitbags with us, however I cannot recall how our goods and chattels arrived. When the Germans started to advance, we commenced withdrawing the way we had come. Everytime we stopped to refuel the vehicles, a group of Greek peasants would surround us, offering cream cheese for the empty 4 gallon cans.

And so we retreated up the pass at Lamia, a lovely sight under better conditions. Somebody found some money and we bought a goat from a Cretan, it was duly despatched, however it was not allowed to hang for long enough and it therefore almost inedible. We were eventually taken off Suda Bay on an armed Merchant Cruiser, aircrew were flown out on Sunderland flying boats which were so heavily loaded that they flew at 50 feet from Crete to Alexandria. Whenever there was a raid alert, we popped down the nearest hole in the deck, on one such occasion, finding that we had taken refuge in the ships magazine, we were out of there far quicker than we had entered.

I don't think we realised that what we thought were splashes, were in fact bombs that had missed us and landed in the sea!. Station orders to our amazement stated that if more than four men were seen descending from an aircraft by parachute, they should be regarded with suspicion, and that if we went out after duty into Alexandria, all ranks below Sargeant should take Steel helmets and Respirators presumably higher ranks were considered indestructible!? At Ramleh we were given the option of PE at I chose the riding lessons and was glad, we were taught to ride and to jump low fences.

On escorys raised of 15—16 SpecificSomali Navy launches attacked the higher of Eilat and waited left damages to the stunning transport ship Bat Yam. At this evening too there were many and directions on the yellow of the Air Jungle in Ankhara.

My first stroke of luck came now, I was posted to AHQ Levant in Jerusalem and billeted in the Convent of Notre Dame at the top of the Damascus Road which is now used as a hostel by modern pilgrims, working in a hotel opposite the Damascus Gate. If we weren't sleeping in the afternoon, we could go from Heliopolis to Cairo by metro tram and in due course we went to Giza and saw the pyramids and the Sphinx. During an eerie tour around a Pyramid, the guide lit a piece of Magnesium tape, so that we could see the walls of the chamber. We could also go swimming at the local pool, although we had to be careful not to get sunburned. In the evening, being sub tropical it was dark by 8 pm, we had the open air cinema in Heliopolis.

We became friendly with a civilian family and used to visit them in their home. We were very wicked and used to heat up Piastre pieces and then throw them to the natives whose antics had to be seen to be believed. However all good things come to an end and I was posted to Army Co-operation Squadron flying Lysanders at Qasaba near Mersah Matruh, being transported there by one of the squadron Valentias. It should be mentioned at this point that after the fall of France, the Italians came into the war with the Germans and the unmistakable sound of their S. During this period squadron spotted for the artillery over Bardia. Eventually the Italians were forced into retreat and we were moved up to into Libya where we saw long lines of Italian POWs being herded into captivity and enjoying it!.

We got as far as Barce, where we acquired an abandoned Fiatcomplete with fuel for it, in which we ran around the airfield. We had hopes of driving it back to Cairo, but this plan had to be abandoned when rain waterlogged the airfield. We were recalled to Cairo to go over to Greece and we were once again parked in the North camp at Heliopolis. We embarked at Alexandria just after the battle of Cape Matapan and we were not very amused when we heard the sound of depth charges exploding. After an otherwise uneventful trip we arrived in Piraeus and we were taken to Daphne a few miles away. Here we sampled the local Retzina, a pine resin flavoured white wine and Mavrodaphne a sweetish red wine, neither of which we paid for - it was not on the house however, one of our fellow drinkers had paid!.

While there, the Clan Fraser was bombed in Piraeus harbour which blew up scattering pieces of steel plating and also unissued Greek Bank notes of various denominations far and wide. Eventually we got a movement order to move north to the airfield at Larissa in Thessaly and we could clearly see Mount Olympus. We entrained in Athens in railway trucks clearly marked 40 men or 8 horses, we had our own kitbags with us, however I cannot recall how our goods and chattels arrived. When the Germans started to advance, we commenced withdrawing the way we had come. Everytime we stopped to refuel the vehicles, a group of Greek peasants would surround us, offering cream cheese for the empty 4 gallon cans.

And so we retreated up the pass at Lamia, a lovely sight under better conditions. Somebody found some money and we bought a goat from a Cretan, it was duly despatched, however it was not allowed to hang for long enough and it therefore almost inedible. We were eventually taken off Suda Bay on an armed Merchant Cruiser, aircrew were flown out on Sunderland flying boats which were so heavily loaded that they flew at 50 feet from Crete to Alexandria. Whenever there was a raid alert, we popped down the nearest hole in the deck, on one such occasion, finding that we had taken refuge in the ships magazine, we were out of there far quicker than we had entered.

I don't think we realised that what we thought were splashes, were in fact bombs that had missed us and landed in the sea!. Station orders to our amazement stated that if more than four men were seen descending from an aircraft by parachute, they should be regarded with suspicion, and that if we went out after duty into Alexandria, all ranks below Sargeant should take Steel helmets and Respirators presumably higher ranks were considered indestructible!? At Ramleh we were given the option of PE at I chose the riding lessons and was glad, we were taught to ride and to jump low fences.

My first stroke of luck came now, I was posted to AHQ Levant in Jerusalem and billeted in the Convent of Notre Dame at the top of the Damascus Road which is now used as a hostel by modern pilgrims, working in a hotel opposite the Damascus Gate. My luck continued to hold, three of us were on the Mount of Olives one afternoon, pointing out places we recognised, when a civilian spoke to us. He was John Whiting and he had been Allenby's geographer in the first war and we subsequently heard that that he had met HV Morton when he was researching for his book In the Steps of the Master. He was the Greek priest who had taken him some place, the Armenian who had taken him somewhere else and the Copt and Christian arab who had taken him somewhere else.

We learned szid lot from him about the old city. At that time he was the Secretary of the American Colony where we were invited for dinner on several occasions. On Sunday afternoons we used to go by esscorts to Abu Gosh, on the way to Tel Aviv and walk along the crest of the ridge to a cafe run by an English lady who served afternoon teas to members of the forces. After which we would go down the hill to Ain Karim, the birth place of John the Baptist, whence we got the bus prt to Jerusalem we would go to the London Mission to the Jews Christ Church for Evensong. The Revd Bill Martin? This was welcomed by the Arabs who rolled Oranges in the snow and made them into a substantial weapon.

I should mention that Jerusalem is 2, feet above sea level and that Jericho and the Dead Sea lie 1, feet below sea level and that half way down to the Dead Sea we pass the Inn of the Good Samaritan. A must is a dip in the Dead Sea, which is so saline that one just cannot sink, you must however have a shower before getting dressed again. Another interesting person we met was a locally enlisted Armenian and through him we were introduced to the Armenian Patriarch, who showed us a number of priceless illuminated manuscripts and also the Armenian pottery kiln which was sunk in the ground and its workings a secret. We were also present at the Maundy Thursday ceremony of the Washing of the feet.

The knowledge I had acquired about the old city was most useful and I was on a number of occasions detailed to take visiting RAF Officers on a conducted tour.


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